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Telapak Publication

Report - 4 April 2006
Behind the Veneer
How Indonesia's Last Rainforests are being Felled for Flooring


Demand-driven illegal logging in Indonesia is destroying one of the world's most important remaining tracts of undisturbed tropical forest. Despite unprecedented enforcement operations by the Indonesian government, every day thousands of hectares of Indonesia's forests are cut illegally to supply the thousands of factories across Asia. Much of this timber is destined for the shelves of high street retailers and builder's merchants in the EU and US.

Merbau, a highly valuable hardwood, is being ruthlessly targeted by illegal logging syndicates in Indonesian Papua to supply the booming demand for tropical hardwood flooring. Outlining the results of recent EIA/Telapak investigations, this briefing tracks the trade in merbau from Papua, via the factories processing merbau for the world's biggest flooring brands, to the shelves of the leading DIY and home improvement retailers of Europe and North America.

Providing case studies on some of the biggest players, the briefing contrasts the environmental claims touted by specific European and American companies with the reality investigators found behind the veneer. It reveals that - though they are not themselves breaking any law - these global flooring companies do not know the precise origin of all the merbau they are selling, that much of the wood originates in Papua, and there is no way of being certain it was not illegally sourced. It also outlines specific examples of illegal activities by Asian companies supplying some of these major brands.


Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English

Download

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pdf file - EN (850 kb)

Briefing - 5 November 2005
Stemming the Tide
Halting The Regional Trade in Stolen TImber in Asia


Stolen timber worth almost two and a half billion dollars is traded between the countries of East and South-East Asia each year. China, which consumes timber from some of the countries most badly affected by illegal logging, is reckoned to be the largest consumer of illegal timber in the world, while Indonesia is the largest tropical supplier. It is clear that if illegal logging is to be effectively countered, the countries of this region must work together.

EIA and Telapak's investigations over the past five years have spanned the region and provide a unique knowledge of this trade and attempts to tackle it. Drawing on this experience, this briefing uses specific case studies to illustrate options for action. Though solutions must necessarily begin with improved enforcement in producer countries against illegal cutting and export of timber, this document focuses on how regional consumer and processing states can work with producer countries to help stem the tide.


Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English

Download

:

pdf file - EN (485 kb)

Report - 17 Februari 2005
The last Frontier
Illegal Logging in Papua and Chinas's Massive Timber Theft


Asia has already lost 95% of its frontier forests. Most of what remains is confined to the Indonesian archipelago, and the province of Papua in Indonesia is home to the largest tract. This report exposes how these last precious forests are being illegally felled and sold off wholesale to China, which is now the largest consumer of stolen timber in the world. One timber species - merbau, a luxurious dark hardwood - is the main target of the illegal loggers in Papua. In undercover meetings with illegal loggers, traders and timber buyers, EIA/Telapak have exposed the shocking scale of the billion-dollar merbau trade, and laid bare the details.

The report exposes for the first time the complex web of middlemen and financiers from across the region responsible for masterminding the theft of Indonesia's forests. From the millionaire timber barons in Jakarta and the officials on their payrolls, the story traces the role of multinational companies in Malaysia, brokers in Singapore and log dealers in Hong Kong. It reveals how in a just a few short years, a small anchorage in eastern China has been transformed into the largest tropical log trading port in the world, while a nearby town has become a global centre for wood flooring manufacture, with 500 huge factories consuming one merbau tree every minute of very working day. Much of this flooring finds its way to consuming countries, including the USA and UK. Every month, enough stolen merbau is shipped from Papua to produce flooring worth in excess of $600 million at western retail prices. For every dollar spent on luxurious merbau flooring in the west, local forest dwellers receive less than half a cent. Meanwhile forest loss in Indonesia is accelerating, with an area the size of Switzerland lost every year.


Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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Indonesia & English

Download

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pdf file - ID (1870 kb) & EN (1130 kb)

Report - 31 Januari 2005
Aid Trace in the Forest
Reviewing EC Development Aid Scheme in Forest Sector in Indonesia Case Study South Central Kalimantan Production Forest Project


One of the EU-Indonesia forestry projects that was assessed by Telapak and its local partners is the South central Kalimantan Production Forest Project (SCKPFP), located in South and Central Kalimantan. This 39 million euro project lasted for 7 years and aimed to develop and replicate sustainable forest management model within the concessions of PT Aya Yayang Indonesia and PT. Dwima Jaya Utama.

In August 2004 Telapak with LPMA and Sumpit undertook a project visit to the project location in Tabalong district, South Kalimantan, to have a direct observation on the project implementation, including its relationship with its local counterparts and the project achievements as claimed by the management.

Surprisingly, the findings were much different from what the management, the EU and the government of Indonesia claimed. The project was implemented unilaterally with little participation of the local people living around the project location. The district administration as the project partner acknowledged that they knew little about the project and that they were not involved in the project's monitoring and evaluation.


Author

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Telapak

Language

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Indonesia & English

Download

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pdf file - ID (722 kb) & EN (707 kb)

Report - 02 November 2004
DEADLY SPRAY FROM THE ARCHIPELAGO
Lessons Learn from the Transformation of Cyanide Fishing to Community Base Coastal Resource Management


Results from several assistance activities carried out by Telapak and its partners show that government efforts to solve the problem of destructive fishing have not yet touch the root of the problem itself. On the contrary, they are stimulating new opportunities to increase such activities. Legal measures taken perceive the fish catching actors as potential source of money. Even if they were arrested, only few that would actually go to court.

While on the other hand, the fishermen themselves feel there are no other alternative livelihoods. What these fishermen need is an opportunity to an alternative source of income by placing them as objects of reform and not as money resource or objects that must be destroyed. Under the current system, jail is not the main solution to the problem. Community approach and assistance that will give them opportunities to reform is the best way to solve this problem.

This book talks about lessons learned from Telapak.s field experiences from 1999 . 2004 in compiling data and developing collaborative learning process with the fishermen who are actors in destructive fishing in several regions in Indonesia.


Author

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Telapak

Language

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English

Download

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pdf file (2.750 KB)

Report - 04 Oktober 2004
The Ramin Racket
The Role of CITES in Curbing Illegal Timber Trade


Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English

Download

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pdf file (773 KB)

Report - 04 February 2004
Profiting from Plunder:
How Malaysia Smuggles Endangered Wood


Telapak/EIA"s new report exposes shocking evidence of how Malaysia is laundering endangered Indonesian ramin wood on an unprecedented scale. We reveal how thousands of tonnes of endangered wood is being smuggled across the border every month by organised criminals and provided with documents including CITES permits certifying it as 'Origin Malaysia', with the complicity of local officials.

Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English & Indonesian

Download

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pdf file (3660 KB) and zip file (2930 KB)

Briefing - 04 December 2003
Update on Tanjung Puting National Park: A report to the CGI meeting, Jakarta, December 2003



Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English

Download

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pdf file (342 KB) and zip file (331 KB)

Report 29 May 2003
Singapore's Illegal Timber Trade & The U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreement


The report, released to coincide with consideration of the US-Singapore Free Trade Agreement by the US Congress, details how Singapore launders illegal timber onto the world market and presents evidence of illegal shipments entering the United States. The report calls on the US and Singapore to take immediate concrete steps to halt the trade in illegal timber.

Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English & Indonesian

Download

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pdf file (1220 KB) and zip file (1170 KB)

Briefing 13 May 2003
Timber Traffickers: How Malaysia and Singapore are reaping a profit from the illegal destruction of Indonesia's tropical forests.

New evidence obtained by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) and Telapak exposes how Malaysia and Singapore continue to launder illegally logged Indonesian wood, including endangered species, on to world markets.

Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English & Indonesian

Download

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pdf file (739 KB) and zip file (1170 KB)

Briefing 13 April 2003
Framed: Italy's Dirty Trade in Stolen Timber


Based on undercover investigations, this shocking briefing exposes the role of Italian picture frame companies in dealing in illegally logged Indonesian ramin wood

Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English

Download

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pdf file (468 KB) and zip file (453 KB)

Report 13 January 2003
Above the Law


Corruption, Collution, Nepotism and Fate of Indonesia's Forests

Author

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Telapak & EIA

Language

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English & Indonesian

Download

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pdf file (1720 KB) and zip file (1370 KB)


Publication Archieve


1. Briefing 29 October 2002: Timber Briefing for the 12CoP to CITES
2. Briefing 01 September 2001 :Illegal Timber Trade in the ASEAN Region
3. Report 01 September 2001 :Timber Trafficking
4. Briefing 01 July 2000 :Illegal Logging in Tanjung Puting National Park
5. Report 2000 Planting Disaster - Menanam Bencana
6. Report 30 August 1999 :The Final Cut

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